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Movies and media from the Concord Field Station

CFS Jerboa movie

This is a high-speed video of a Lesser Egyptian Jerboa. In this shot, the jerboa is skipping across a force plate at 0.87 m/s. The film is recorded at 500 frames per second. Jerboas demonstrate three different running gaits. While this rodent resmebles the kangaroo rat, it independently converged upon bipedal locomotion. This film was shot by graduate student, Talia Moore . Movie - 4.5 megabytes

 
click for the Harvard Magazine article

Harvard Magazine ran an article on the Concord Field Station in the January-February 2002 issue. The article contains six pages of beautiful photography and shows several of the ongoing field station research projects.

 
CFS Cockatiel movie

This is a slow motion video of a cockatiel flying in the Concord Field Station wind tunnel. The cockatiel was flying at approximately 12 meters per second and was filmed at 500 frames per second with a high speed digital video camera. The video is slowed down to 6% of actual speed so you can watch the cockatiel's wingbeats in extreme slow motion. The cockatiels and wind tunnel are used in the research projects of Jim Usherwood and Ty Hedrick. Large movie - 20 megabytes Small movie - 3 megabytes

 
CFS emu chick

This movie is of an emu chick running on the Concord Field Station treadmill. Like the cockatiel video described above, this was taken using a high-speed digital video camera and then slowed down for analysis. ;The white markers attached to the emu's left limb at the joints facilitate kinematic analysis. The emus are part of Russ Main's ontogenetic scaling project. movie - 4 megabytes

 
CFS Wallaby

Here we have a tammar wallaby hopping on the Concord Field Station treadmill as was shown in some of the still photographs in the Harvard Magazine article. As in the other videos, this sequence was captured at high speed (250 frames per second) and is played back at a reduced rate to allow slow motion viewing and analysis. The white markers attached to the wallaby's left limb at the joints facilitate kinematic analysis. The wallabies are part of Craig McGowan's research project. movie - 2.4 megabytes

 

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